Do I have Thyroid Disease

200 million people worldwide have a Thyroid Disorder.

Of the 30 million people above about half are undiagnosed.

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Every cell in the body has receptors for thyroid hormone. These hormones are responsible for the most basic aspects of body function, impacting all major systems of the body.

Thyroid imbalance could be the source of your biggest health problems. But many people don’t realize that their symptoms are frequently caused by a thyroid disorder or imbalance.

Thyroid hormone directly acts on the brain, the G.I. tract, the cardiovascular system, bone metabolism, red blood cell metabolism, gall bladder and liver function, steroid hormone production, glucose metabolism, lipid and cholesterol metabolism, protein metabolism and body temperature regulation. You can think of the thyroid as the central gear in a sophisticated engine. If that gear breaks, the entire engine goes down with it.

Some Key Facts [1]
• Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of an underachieve thyroid (hypothyroidism). In Europe and the United States it variably affects 2-4 percent of the population, while it occurs more often in women than in men.
• Congenital hypothyroidism: 1 per 3,000 – 4,000 newborns are affected by congenital hypothyroidism in North America, Europe, Japan and Australia, (Genetics Home Reference website).
• Thyroid cancer is the 16th most common cancer worldwide (the 8th among women): for example, in 2013, there were an estimated 637,115 people living with thyroid cancer in the US.
• The incidence rate of thyroid cancer has increased by at least 150% since 1970.
– Without realising, symptoms you are experiencing, could be a result of an underlying thyroid disorder.
– 1 in 10 people worldwide will suffer with some form of thyroid disorder. Thyroid Disorders affect more Women than Men!
– If you are unsure, speak to your doctor and request thyroid pathology and a thyroid ultrasound to be sure.

May 25th is World Thyroid Day

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This is a Day that essentially belongs to the people—to thyroid patients, pregnant women, those children exposed to inadequate iodine intake, in a word, to all who suffer from thyroid ailments and deserve a better standard of care.

Listen to my Thyroid Special with Ben Coomber

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Most common thyroid gland problems could be divided into a few groups:

1.Thyroiditis

2. Hypothyroidism

       a. Congenital known as Cretinism

       b. Aquired Hypothyroidism

3. Hyperthyroidism

4. Goiter

5. Autoimmune thyroid disease

        a. Graves disease

        b. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

6. Thyroid cancer

Read in more detail about these problems HERE.

Signs of thyroid problems could take a whole page to fill. A lot of them are very vague or common, like brain fog, weight gain, chills, or hair loss that a lot of people take it as a sign of getting older. Lets take a look at Most hidden signs of thyroid problems.

If you would like to learn more how to diagnose and for tips how to manage your thyroid gland please visit my webpage for lots of additional information.

To your health, ~ Vilma

Dr.Vilma Brunhuber, CHHC is a health coach for Woman’s Health & Thyroid Wellness. She is most passionate about helping others discover the gift of holistic health, showing others how to create healthy lifestyle. She suffered with thyroid disease for many years which lead her look into alternatives how to feel better because medication was helping only partially with thyroid condition.

Vilma offers a limited number of free coaching sessions per month in person, over the phone or via Skype. Book a FREE no obligation session with me vilmaswellness@gmail.com and see how I can help and support you to achieve all your Health & Lifestyle goals!

Source:

  1. Thyroid Federation Internatonal
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